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One Vast Hospital Walking Tour

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Enjoy an evening of Civil War era Music and Dancing in an historic Civil War era barn near Gettysburg, PA featuring music provided by the “SUSQUEHANNA TRAVELLERS” along with Dance Masters Norma Calhoun and Wayne Belt. Located at beautiful Beech Springs Farm at 784 Mt. Carmel Road in Orrtanna, PA. Period attire is encouraged, but not required.

Doors open at 6:00 pm, dancing is from 7:00 until 10:00. Admission includes Dancing, Light Fare and Silent Auction. Event Parking is FREE.

ONLY 100 tickets will be sold, so purchase your tickets early. Event is held rain or shine.

$35.00 per person in advance $40 at the door. Kids 6-15 are $10.00 Advance sales end at midnight Sept 29, 2022.

Proceeds benefit the award-winning HGAC BARN PRESERVATION PROJECT and GRANT PROGRAM.

For more information visit: www.HGAConline.org or call HGAC at (717) 334-5185.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Come celebrate the 159th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. This history-filled two-day event will feature battle reenactments, artillery and cavalry demonstrations, living history programs, tours of the historic and restored house & barn, and much more each day!

This two-day, family-friendly Civil War event will take place on the hallowed ground of the GBPA’s 146-acre Daniel Lady Farm which borders the Gettysburg National Military Park at Benner Hill. The farm was the site of artillery placements and infantry preparations for the Confederate attack on Culp’s Hill. The house and barn became a field hospital. Shell fragments and soldiers’ carved initials are preserved in the barn, along with blood-stained floors in the house.

Click here to purchase tickets.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Come celebrate the 159th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. This history-filled two-day event will feature battle reenactments, artillery and cavalry demonstrations, living history programs, tours of the historic and restored house & barn, and much more each day!

This two-day, family-friendly Civil War event will take place on the hallowed ground of the GBPA’s 146-acre Daniel Lady Farm which borders the Gettysburg National Military Park at Benner Hill. The farm was the site of artillery placements and infantry preparations for the Confederate attack on Culp’s Hill. The house and barn became a field hospital. Shell fragments and soldiers’ carved initials are preserved in the barn, along with blood-stained floors in the house.

Click here to purchase tickets.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Enjoy an afternoon on the Terrace of Two Mile House with lemonade and cookies as Mary Caverly leads tours through the house detailing the artwork on the walls.

Click here to register.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Celebrate our region’s history as an early center for iron making at this festival featuring blacksmithing demonstrations; hands-on casting and molding demonstrations by experts from Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site; guided tours of the historic village by costumed interpreters; a beer and wine garden; plein air artists; delicious historic foods; a wide variety of iron and metalwork arts, crafts, and jewelry; live period music; whimsical cannonball tosses and anvil-lifting contests; children’s activities; make it/take it opportunities, and more!  Partner events in surrounding parks and towns—including exhibits at the Museum of the Ironworker, educational speakers at the Thurmont Public Library, guided tours of the charcoal trail in nearby Catoctin Mountain National Park, and a commemoration of the role of Africans in ironmaking at Catoctin.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Nestled among Maryland’s mountains is St. Joseph’s Academy, Mother Seton’s historic 19th century boarding school. You’ll meet the Seton Shrine’s celebrated Junior History Interpreters – girls ages 8-16 who portray real students of Mother Seton and her Sisters. Jump back in time with stories, music, farm animals, and more.

What To Expect:

  • Most visitors will spend about two hours at the Shrine.
  • You will encounter many historical interpreters, many of whom portray actual students from Mother Seton’s time! Don’t be shy: you are encouraged to speak with them, but don’t be surprised if their knowledge doesn’t exceed the year 1818.
  • Visit the farm animals from Cruann Farms Petting Zoo
  • Move your muscles and learn how physically taxing doing laundry could be
  • Try your hand at fiber arts
  • Learn how to write with a nib pen and ink
  • Dabble in some watercolor
  • Break a sweat at colonial dancing and outdoor games

Nestled among Maryland’s mountains is St. Joseph’s Academy, Mother Seton’s historic 19th century boarding school. You’ll meet the Seton Shrine’s celebrated Junior History Interpreters – girls ages 8-16 who portray real students of Mother Seton and her Sisters. Jump back in time with stories, music, farm animals, and more.

What To Expect:

  • Most visitors will spend about two hours at the Shrine.
  • You will encounter many historical interpreters, many of whom portray actual students from Mother Seton’s time! Don’t be shy: you are encouraged to speak with them, but don’t be surprised if their knowledge doesn’t exceed the year 1818.
  • Visit the farm animals from Cruann Farms Petting Zoo
  • Move your muscles and learn how physically taxing doing laundry could be
  • Try your hand at fiber arts
  • Learn how to write with a nib pen and ink
  • Dabble in some watercolor
  • Break a sweat at colonial dancing and outdoor games

Nestled among Maryland’s mountains is St. Joseph’s Academy, Mother Seton’s historic 19th century boarding school. You’ll meet the Seton Shrine’s celebrated Junior History Interpreters – girls ages 8-16 who portray real students of Mother Seton and her Sisters. Jump back in time with stories, music, farm animals, and more.

What To Expect:

  • Most visitors will spend about two hours at the Shrine.
  • You will encounter many historical interpreters, many of whom portray actual students from Mother Seton’s time! Don’t be shy: you are encouraged to speak with them, but don’t be surprised if their knowledge doesn’t exceed the year 1818.
  • Visit the farm animals from Cruann Farms Petting Zoo
  • Move your muscles and learn how physically taxing doing laundry could be
  • Try your hand at fiber arts
  • Learn how to write with a nib pen and ink
  • Dabble in some watercolor
  • Break a sweat at colonial dancing and outdoor games

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

23rd annual History Meets the Arts Show & Sale. Over 20 artists in person. Friday April 8 from 10:00 am to 7:00 pm. Saturday April 9 from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. Paintings, art prints, artist and author signings, sculpture, working demonstrations, 18th century period contemporary accoutrements. Free admittance.

Artists & authors in person include: Steve Auvenshine, John Barrett, John Buxton, Kyle Carroll, Bill & Wayne Fluke, Brad Fountain, Jennifer Frantz, Dale Gallon, Robert Griffing, Wayne Hyde, Todd Price, Keith Rocco, Tim Sanner, Bradley Schmehl, Larry Selman, Jeff Shaara, Bryant White, Pamela Patrick White & David Wright.

23rd annual History Meets the Arts Show & Sale. Over 20 artists in person. Friday April 8 from 10:00 am to 7:00 pm. Saturday April 9 from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. Paintings, art prints, artist and author signings, sculpture, working demonstrations, 18th century period contemporary accoutrements. Free admittance.

Artists & authors in person include: Steve Auvenshine, John Barrett, John Buxton, Kyle Carroll, Bill & Wayne Fluke, Brad Fountain, Jennifer Frantz, Dale Gallon, Robert Griffing, Wayne Hyde, Todd Price, Keith Rocco, Tim Sanner, Bradley Schmehl, Larry Selman, Jeff Shaara, Bryant White, Pamela Patrick White & David Wright.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

The Shippensburg History Center located at 52 West King Street in Shippensburg, home of the Shippensburg Historical Society, will be hosting an open house on Saturday, March 26, from 12:00 PM – 3:00 PM. This program marks the start of this year’s theme of “Rediscovering History.” Activities are planned throughout the afternoon. House tours of the historic Stewart House will be given at 1:00 PM and at 2:00 PM. Other activities include “History Up Close” in which an interpreter will go over three artifacts in our collection that has a story behind them. These artifacts will include one artifact, one textile, and one framed object. While patrons are here, they can see the status of the Shippensburg Community Band exhibit, and the unveiling of the “Shippensburg, A Wilderness Settlement” exhibit. Interpreters dressed in historic clothing will also be on hand to talk about the importance of the wilderness settlement. Our Hands-On History cart will also be available with plenty of fun Colonial-era games. This event is free, but donations are encouraged!

History…..all we need to know we learned from our textbooks right? WRONG! Our resident historian, Dudley K. Nowledge returns to share some more history the only way he knows how…..with a few drinks in hand. Join us for an evening of laughter and “learning.” On the curriculum this month is the history of whiskey and St. Patty’s Day. This event is PG rated for mild language and innuendo.

Event is March 24th at 6 pm. There are nine private tables seating four persons each for the evening. You are booking ONE 4-person table for you and three guests at $20 per table. You may book more than one table if you wish.

Relive the glory of the silent-film era, accompanied by the mighty Wurlitzer!

U.S. Marine sergeants Quirt and Flagg are inveterate romantic rivals on peacetime assignments in China and the Philippines. In 1917, WWI brings them to France, where Flagg, now a captain, takes up with flirtatious Charmaine, the inn-keeper’s daughter.

Relive the glory of the silent-film era, accompanied by the mighty Wurlitzer!

A sheriff’s milquetoast son has a chance to prove himself when a medicine show run by con artists comes into town.

Thrifty visitors, take note! The existence of our winter combo tours seems to be one of the (unintentionally) best kept secrets in Gettysburg. These ghostly adventures are offered on Saturday nights during the winter season (weather permitting), and beware: when space fills up – they’re gone!

The exciting news, if you’re reading this in early January, is that the season has only just begun. Our special combo tours are offered on Saturdays starting January 8 at 7:00 PM, and they run all the way through March 12 (weather permitting) with the exception of February 12th when the tour time will be 6 PM. Please note, Ghostly Images is only open Saturdays from 3:00 PM until the time of the tour. We will also have a 6 PM Tour on Friday, February 11th.

Thrifty visitors, take note! The existence of our winter combo tours seems to be one of the (unintentionally) best kept secrets in Gettysburg. These ghostly adventures are offered on Saturday nights during the winter season (weather permitting), and beware: when space fills up – they’re gone!

The exciting news, if you’re reading this in early January, is that the season has only just begun. Our special combo tours are offered on Saturdays starting January 8 at 7:00 PM, and they run all the way through March 12 (weather permitting) with the exception of February 12th when the tour time will be 6 PM. Please note, Ghostly Images is only open Saturdays from 3:00 PM until the time of the tour. We will also have a 6 PM Tour on Friday, February 11th.

Maverick Modigliani

Marking the centenary of the death of Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920), this documentary feature is the story of a remarkable talent that transcended stereotypes. From his origins in Livorno, Italy to the Paris of Picasso and Brancusi that became the center of modernity, to his love for his wife and frequent subject of his portraits Jeanne Hébuterne, the film depicts the life and work of an avant-garde artist who has become a contemporary classic.

Thrifty visitors, take note! The existence of our winter combo tours seems to be one of the (unintentionally) best kept secrets in Gettysburg. These ghostly adventures are offered on Saturday nights during the winter season (weather permitting), and beware: when space fills up – they’re gone!

The exciting news, if you’re reading this in early January, is that the season has only just begun. Our special combo tours are offered on Saturdays starting January 8 at 7:00 PM, and they run all the way through March 12 (weather permitting) with the exception of February 12th when the tour time will be 6 PM. Please note, Ghostly Images is only open Saturdays from 3:00 PM until the time of the tour. We will also have a 6 PM Tour on Friday, February 11th.

Thrifty visitors, take note! The existence of our winter combo tours seems to be one of the (unintentionally) best kept secrets in Gettysburg. These ghostly adventures are offered on Saturday nights during the winter season (weather permitting), and beware: when space fills up – they’re gone!

The exciting news, if you’re reading this in early January, is that the season has only just begun. Our special combo tours are offered on Saturdays starting January 8 at 7:00 PM, and they run all the way through March 12 (weather permitting) with the exception of February 12th when the tour time will be 6 PM. Please note, Ghostly Images is only open Saturdays from 3:00 PM until the time of the tour. We will also have a 6 PM Tour on Friday, February 11th.

In honor of President’s Day weekend, take a 60-minute walking tour and learn about three Presidents (Lincoln, Eisenhower and Kennedy) who impacted the town of Gettysburg!

Walk the streets of Gettysburg with a Gettysburg Licensed Town Guide and experience President Lincoln’s 25 hours in Gettysburg. You will walk where he walked and see what he saw and hear civilian’s stories of what they experienced those two days in November 1863. On this tour you will also hear about Eisenhower’s Gettysburg experiences beginning in 1915 and ending with his retirement years in the 1960’s. We have stories about Ike and Mamie you will not find in history books! President Kennedy, Jackie and Carolyn visited Gettysburg March 31,1963 on a bright sunny day. Find out what they saw and experienced during this visit.

Reservations are required a minimum of an hour prior to each tour.

Exhibition on Screen: The Danish Collector – Delacroix to Gauguin

For many years, no-one was interested in the art of the Impressionists. Artists like Monet, Degas, and Renoir were vilified, attacked, and left penniless as a result. Then something remarkable happened.

A new breed of collectors emerged, and before long, they were battling to acquire any work by these new radical artists that they could find. Amongst them was the visionary Danish businessman Wilhelm Hansen.

From Hansen’s beautiful house and gardens at Ordrupgaard to the streets of bohemian Paris, this film takes you on a journey to discover some of the best examples of 19th-century French art ever collected.

Featuring a talk by Hagerstown Civil War Round Table member Justin Mayhue on Colonel Edward Mobley of the 7th Maryland Infantry from Hagerstown. The event is at 7:30 pm. Dinner at 6:30 pm, open to non-members as well as members, is $25 (reservations required by January 21) and the talk at 7:30 pm is $5 for non-members, both payable at the meeting. For more information visit the above link and search for: Hagerstown Civil War Round Table. Justin Mayhue is a retired Battalion Chief of the Hagerstown, MD Fire Department, docent at the Hagerstown Fire Museum, author of five books. He is the past president of the HCWRT and he has been an actor in God’s and Generals, Ladder 49 and numerous History Channel projects. Justin is a certified Battlefield Guide at Antietam, Harper’s Ferry and South Mountain. Justin has conducted over 1,000 career tours.