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One Vast Hospital Walking Tour

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Frederick’s annual Pride celebration brings together people from all walks of life to celebrate and reflect upon the LGBTQ community. More detail to come.

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Join us for a wonder-filled day of arts and wellness! Aura photography, bodywork, energywork including Reiki, original art, vetted intuitive readers, crystals, essential oils, handmade jewelry and gift items, luxurious spa products, and more! Free admission, free workshops, low-cost services. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. www.illuminatefestivals.com

Fighting occurred in the streets during the first day’s battle and Confederates occupied the town during the remainder of the battle. Learn about the fighting in the streets, alleys & yards, as the town’s people sought refuge in their cellars as the war was brought to their doorsteps. Walk the streets and alleys with a Guide and hear the stories of the civilians who lived through these violent days as the battle spilled into the town of Gettysburg.

All tours must be booked at least an hour before the starting time. You may call: (717) 253-5737 or book through our website: Gettysburg Licensed Town Guides (gbltg.com)

Tours are held between 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM – 90 minute duration with easy walking.

Meeting place is confirmed at time of reservation.

Looking for something else? Contact us and we will make every effort to accommodate your request.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

“BARN ART IS BACK”
The 14th Annual HGAC BarnArt Show & Sale Returns in 2022!

Many of the area’s most noted artists will be showing their work in the 14th Annual BarnArt Show & Sale.

Proceeds from this popular event will benefit the Barn Preservation Project and Grant Program sponsored by Historic Gettysburg-Adams County (HGAC). It will be held at the G.A.R. Hall at 53 East Middle St. in historic downtown Gettysburg from Friday, June 10 until Sunday, June 12.

All the artworks accepted into this unique exhibit must include a representation of a barn or a detail of a barn.

The show opens on Friday, June 10 with an Opening Night Reception that is free and open to the public from 6:00 pm until 8:00 pm. Winners of awards will be announced during the reception at 7:30.

Cash prize for “Best of Show in Fine Art” will be $1,000 (prize donated by J.Jay Mackie, Ph.D. and Monica Oss). There will also be a prize for “Best of Show” in photography and the ever-popular “People’s Choice Award.” New this year will be the “Artists’ Choice” which will be awarded to the artwork voted best by the participating artists.

A special feature of this year’s show will be a presentation of video footage of historic Adams County barns shot during recent barn surveys using drones operated by volunteers Mark Clowney and Loy Elliott. HGAC has surveyed more than 375 barns in Adams County creating a permanent record of each barn as part of the HGAC Barn Registry.

Hours for the BarnArt Show & Sale are Friday, June 10 from 6-8 pm and Sat. June 11 from 10 am – 6 pm and Sun. June 12 from noon until 4:00 pm.

To register for the BarnArt Show & Sale print the “BarnArt 2022 Registration Form” and return it with your registration fee to HGAC. Art works may be offered for display only or they may be offered for sale. HGAC will conduct the sales transactions, retaining 30%, with the artist receiving the balance with 30 days after the close of the Show. All art works MUST be ready to hang. Art Intake dates and times will be provided to registered artists.

For more information call event chair, Paul Mangan at (717) 357-3145

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Nestled among Maryland’s mountains is St. Joseph’s Academy, Mother Seton’s historic 19th century boarding school. You’ll meet the Seton Shrine’s celebrated Junior History Interpreters – girls ages 8-16 who portray real students of Mother Seton and her Sisters. Jump back in time with stories, music, farm animals, and more.

What To Expect:

  • Most visitors will spend about two hours at the Shrine.
  • You will encounter many historical interpreters, many of whom portray actual students from Mother Seton’s time! Don’t be shy: you are encouraged to speak with them, but don’t be surprised if their knowledge doesn’t exceed the year 1818.
  • Visit the farm animals from Cruann Farms Petting Zoo
  • Move your muscles and learn how physically taxing doing laundry could be
  • Try your hand at fiber arts
  • Learn how to write with a nib pen and ink
  • Dabble in some watercolor
  • Break a sweat at colonial dancing and outdoor games

Nestled among Maryland’s mountains is St. Joseph’s Academy, Mother Seton’s historic 19th century boarding school. You’ll meet the Seton Shrine’s celebrated Junior History Interpreters – girls ages 8-16 who portray real students of Mother Seton and her Sisters. Jump back in time with stories, music, farm animals, and more.

What To Expect:

  • Most visitors will spend about two hours at the Shrine.
  • You will encounter many historical interpreters, many of whom portray actual students from Mother Seton’s time! Don’t be shy: you are encouraged to speak with them, but don’t be surprised if their knowledge doesn’t exceed the year 1818.
  • Visit the farm animals from Cruann Farms Petting Zoo
  • Move your muscles and learn how physically taxing doing laundry could be
  • Try your hand at fiber arts
  • Learn how to write with a nib pen and ink
  • Dabble in some watercolor
  • Break a sweat at colonial dancing and outdoor games

Nestled among Maryland’s mountains is St. Joseph’s Academy, Mother Seton’s historic 19th century boarding school. You’ll meet the Seton Shrine’s celebrated Junior History Interpreters – girls ages 8-16 who portray real students of Mother Seton and her Sisters. Jump back in time with stories, music, farm animals, and more.

What To Expect:

  • Most visitors will spend about two hours at the Shrine.
  • You will encounter many historical interpreters, many of whom portray actual students from Mother Seton’s time! Don’t be shy: you are encouraged to speak with them, but don’t be surprised if their knowledge doesn’t exceed the year 1818.
  • Visit the farm animals from Cruann Farms Petting Zoo
  • Move your muscles and learn how physically taxing doing laundry could be
  • Try your hand at fiber arts
  • Learn how to write with a nib pen and ink
  • Dabble in some watercolor
  • Break a sweat at colonial dancing and outdoor games

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Join us for a wonder-filled day of arts and wellness! Aura photography, bodywork, energywork including Reiki, original art, vetted intuitive readers, crystals, essential oils, handmade jewelry and gift items, luxurious spa products, and more! Free admission, free workshops, low-cost services. Under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. www.illuminatefestivals.com

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

Every Saturday and Sunday at 2:00 PM from April until October, docents from the National Museum of Civil War Medicine will explain how Frederick became “One Vast Hospital.” Arguably the most trying moment in city’s history came after the Battle of Antietam in the fall of 1862. The town’s population doubled when 8,000 wounded soldiers were delivered by ambulance to make-shift hospitals throughout Frederick.

Tickets are $15 and include admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in addition to the walking tour. Tickets are free for Museum members, but you must still reserve your spot. Reservations will be accepted on a first come first served basis. Click below to buy your ticket today.

With accounts taken from the diaries and letters of the surgeons, soldiers, and civilians who were there, this guided walking tour will explore the locations of the city’s Civil War hospitals in churches, schools, and public buildings. This program is an excellent way to take in downtown Frederick as many of those same buildings still make up the historic district today.

Throughout the American Civil War, Frederick, Maryland played a vital role to both Union and Confederate armies. Soldiers marched beneath the “Clustered Spires” on their way to battles at Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. The “One Vast Hospital” tour focuses on the wreckage left behind.

The Shippensburg History Center located at 52 West King Street in Shippensburg, home of the Shippensburg Historical Society, will be hosting an open house on Saturday, March 26, from 12:00 PM – 3:00 PM. This program marks the start of this year’s theme of “Rediscovering History.” Activities are planned throughout the afternoon. House tours of the historic Stewart House will be given at 1:00 PM and at 2:00 PM. Other activities include “History Up Close” in which an interpreter will go over three artifacts in our collection that has a story behind them. These artifacts will include one artifact, one textile, and one framed object. While patrons are here, they can see the status of the Shippensburg Community Band exhibit, and the unveiling of the “Shippensburg, A Wilderness Settlement” exhibit. Interpreters dressed in historic clothing will also be on hand to talk about the importance of the wilderness settlement. Our Hands-On History cart will also be available with plenty of fun Colonial-era games. This event is free, but donations are encouraged!

An Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, literary scholar, journalist, cultural critic and institution builder, Henry Louis Gates Jr. has authored seventeen books and created fourteen documentary films. Host of the popular show Finding Your Roots, Professor Gates is one of the United States’ most influential cultural critics and is both an eloquent commentator and formidable intellectual force on multicultural and African American issues. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford African American Studies Center, the first comprehensive scholarly online resource in the field of African American Studies and Africana Studies. His six-part PBS documentary series, The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross (2013), which he wrote, executive produced and hosted, earned the Emmy Award for Outstanding Historical Program — Long Form, as well as the Peabody Award and NAACP Image Award. Gates is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. He has received 54 honorary degrees, from institutions including the University of Pennsylvania, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, New York University and Howard University. In 2006, he was inducted into the Sons of the American Revolution, after he traced his lineage back to John Redman, a Free Negro who fought in the Revolutionary War.

A separately ticketed meet-and-greet reception will take place immediately following the event.  For an additional $75 you can meet the speaker for a photo opportunity, a signing opportunity (whenever possible), and light hors d’oeuvres and refreshments. All proceeds from the meet-and-greet reception will benefit children’s programs at Frederick County Public Libraries.

Learn about the tradition of making maple syrup at this year’s 50th Maple Syrup Festival! More details will be released in early 2022. Stay tuned for information!

Learn about the tradition of making maple syrup at this year’s 50th Maple Syrup Festival! More details will be released in early 2022. Stay tuned for information!

Strawberry Hill’s annual sugaring festival is back at Camp Eder for one day only!

Saturday, March 5th

 

Tree to Table Tours

Learn the history of maple syrup, see the

sugaring process from start to finish, and taste the final product

 

Camp Style Breakfast

Warm-up by the fire while you enjoy pancakes, sausage,

coffee, hot chocolate, and more!

 

Fun for All Ages

Proceeds benefit environmental

education programs at Strawberry Hill

 

The “Sweet Deal” package includes breakfast AND a tour:

$15 for adults (12+)

$10 for children ages 3-12

Kids under 3 years old are FREE!

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

Under the direction of Prof. Yan Sun, Gettysburg College art history students examine diverse depictions of workers and scenes of labor to consider issues of identity, equality, and injustice across cultures and historical periods. Works by artists Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Riva Helfond, Thomas Allom, and Pablo O’Higgins are included in this exhibition, alongside original posters from the Chinese Cultural Revolution and photographs from the Meiji Period in Japan, among others.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibition is supported by Special Collections and College Archives, Musselman Library and the Department of Art and Art History, Gettysburg College.

Schmucker Art Gallery will be closed December 9, 2021 through January 27, 2022 for Gettysburg College’s winter break.

Gallery hours are Tuesday–Saturday, 10am-4pm.

Building is accessible.

In honor of President’s Day weekend, take a 60-minute walking tour and learn about three Presidents (Lincoln, Eisenhower and Kennedy) who impacted the town of Gettysburg!

Walk the streets of Gettysburg with a Gettysburg Licensed Town Guide and experience President Lincoln’s 25 hours in Gettysburg. You will walk where he walked and see what he saw and hear civilian’s stories of what they experienced those two days in November 1863. On this tour you will also hear about Eisenhower’s Gettysburg experiences beginning in 1915 and ending with his retirement years in the 1960’s. We have stories about Ike and Mamie you will not find in history books! President Kennedy, Jackie and Carolyn visited Gettysburg March 31,1963 on a bright sunny day. Find out what they saw and experienced during this visit.

Reservations are required a minimum of an hour prior to each tour.